English Questions for CDS & CAPF 2019: 25th June


Dear Students, Defence Adda is providing you all with this quiz on English Language questions for CDS, AFCAT, CAPF and other Defecnce Examinations. One can attempt the maximum number of questions in the minimum time in the English Language section of defense competitive exams. If you have the basics of the important topics of English all groups, you can definitely score good marks in the upcoming defense examinations. Practicing daily with daily quizzes on Defence Adda not only ensures good marks in this section but also strengthens your chances of getting through the above-mentioned defence examinations.


Direction (1-5): A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Real policemen, both in Britain and the United States hardly recognize any resemblance between their lives and what they see on TV-if they ever get home in time. There are similarities, of course, but the cops don’t think much of them. The first difference is that a policeman’s real life revolves round the law. Most of his training is in criminal law. He has to know exactly what actions are crimes and what evidence can be used to prove them in court. He has to know nearly as much law as a professional lawyer, and what is more, he has to apply it on his feet, in the dark and rain, running down an alley after someone he wants to talk to.

Little of his time is spent in chatting to scantily-clad ladies or in dramatic confrontations with desperate criminals. He will spend most of his working life typing millions of words on thousands of forms about hundreds of sad, unimportant people who are guilty-or not-of stupid, petty crimes. Most television crime drama is about finding the criminal; as soon as he’s arrested, the story is over. In real life, finding criminals is seldom much of a problem. Except in very serious cases like murders and terrorist attacks-where failure to produce results reflects on the standing of the police-little effort is spent on searching. The police have an elaborate machinery which eventually shows up most wanted men.

Q1. Which of the following statements is correct?
(a) Policemen feel that the image of their lives shown on TV is not accurate
(b) Policemen feel that there is a close resemblance between their lives and what they see on TV
(c) Policemen recognize no similarity in their lives and what they see on TV
(d) Policemen love their image as projected on TV

Q2. The everyday life of a policeman or detective is
(a) exciting and glamorous
(b) full of danger
(c) spent in recording details about small thefts and crimes
(d) spent in chatting to scantily-clad ladies or in dramatic confrontations with desperate criminals.

Q3. It is essential for a policeman to be trained in criminal law
(a) so that he can catch criminals in the streets
(b) because many of the criminals are dangerous
(c) so that he can justify his arrests in court
(d) because he has to identify criminal acts

Q4. When murders and terrorist attacks occur, the police
(a) prefer to wait for the criminal to give himself away
(b) spend a lot of effort on trying to track their man down
(c) try to make a quick arrest in order to keep up their reputation
(d) usually fail to produce results

Q5. Which of the following statements is false?
(a) A policeman requires training.
(b) A policeman should know criminal law.
(c) A policeman must provide evidence in the court of law.
(d) A policeman does not need to know as much law as a professional lawyer.

Direction (6-10): A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

I am always amazed when I hear people saying that sport creates goodwill between the nations, and that if only the common people of the world could meet one another at football or cricket, they would have no inclination to meet on the battlefield. Even if one didn’t know from concrete examples (the 1936 Olympic Games, for instance) that international sporting contests lead to orgies of hatred, one could deduce it from general principles. Nearly all the sports practiced nowadays are competitive. You play to win, and the game has little meaning unless you do your utmost to win. In the village where you pick up sides and no feeling of local patriotism is involved, it is possible to play simply for the fun and exercise, but as soon as the question of prestige arises, as soon as you feel that you and some larger unit will be disgraced if you lose, the most savage combative instincts are aroused. Anyone who has played even in a school football match knows this. At the international level sport is frankly mimic warfare. But the significant thing is not the behaviour of the players but the attitude of the spectators: and, behind the spectators, of the nations who work themselves into furies over these absurd contests, and seriously believe-at any rate for short periods-that running, jumping and kicking a ball are tests of national virtue.

Q6. The author of the passage believes that
(a) sport creates goodwill
(b) sport is entertainment
(c) sport is not a test of courage
(d) sport is not a test of national virtue

Q7. By ‘concrete examples’, the writer is referring to
(a) cement buildings
(b) historic events
(c) specific cases
(d) common cases

Q8. In competitive games, you
(a) plan to win
(b) dream to win
(c) hope to win
(d) play to win

Q9. At the international level, sports
(a) can lead to war
(b) are an imitation of war
(c) can result in players trying to kill each other
(d) often causes serious injury

Q10. Orgies are
(a) wild riots
(b) private shows
(c) brutal warfare
(d) excessive indulgence

SOLUTIONS

S1. Ans.(c)

S2. Ans.(c)

S3. Ans.(c)

S4. Ans.(d)

S5. Ans.(d)

S6. Ans.(d)

S7. Ans.(c)

S8. Ans.(d)

S9. Ans.(b)

S10. Ans.(d)


                               

No comments